Rugged rocks at West Point

According to an ABC new story, ‘the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania said West Point or nungu included a hut depression excavated in the 1970s. It said there was a cremation in the centre of one of the huts and a seashell necklace was also uncovered there.’  We did not know the location of this depression.

Jeanette thought the landscape was rugged. A very raw environment on a serene calm day.  20171226_121738.jpg

20171226_123205.jpg

20171226_123532.jpg

20171226_123616.jpg

20171226_123930.jpg

20171226_124044.jpg

20171226_124213.jpg

20171226_124218.jpg

20171226_124605.jpgI look at my travelling buddy’s photos and I am excited by the appearance of these rocks. The upthrusts are dramatic.  I can see orange and yellow lichens have grown on them despite (or is it because of) the dramatic weather and salt that these rocks endure.  Even with extreme weathering, these rocks haven’t developed a smooth rounding making me guess the rock is granite or a similar very hard igneous rock type.

Lately I have been watching movies and documentaries set in New Zealand which have helped me to realise that the geological age of their mountains is so much younger than those in the very old and worn Australian landscape. When I researched the geology of the Tasmanian west coast area, I found it has the oldest rocks; Pre-Cambrian 1000-600 million years old.  This was a time before soils had developed and plants had evolved, therefore the rocks were unprotected and the wearing down process began immediately. During the Cambrian period 600-500 million years, volcanoes erupted across Tasmania. It is possible some of the West Point rocks emerged at that time.  Geological studies indicate this West Point area is fundamentally Pre-Cambrian; incidentally that was a time in history when Tasmania was connected to north America – apparently Tasmania has rock relatives in Montana, Idaho (USA) and British Columbia (Canada).

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Marrawah, Tarkine and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s